Waiting for localhost

#1

Hello,

I am brand new to Node-Red and am having an issue getting Node Red to run on a Windows 10 machine. It was working fine for a day or so, but then as I was editing a flow, it stopped responding all together. I have uninstalled Node-Red completely and reinstalled, and that was not the issue. I have the Command Prompt running the program, but the browser just sits and states that it is "Waiting for localhost". In my browser bar I have tried both "localhost:1880" as well as the IP address "127.0.0.0:1880" that is show in the CMD as the server is running on.

Thanks

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#2

Are you sure it is not 127.0.0.1:1880?

Of course the best solution (IMO) when you have a problem with Windows is to ditch it and install Ubuntu. Come to think of it, even if you haven't got a problem that is the best course of action. :slight_smile:

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#3

You are correct. I typed that wrong....127.0.0.1:1880 it is.

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#4

Please let's leave prejudice at the door thanks! All platforms have their strengths and weaknesses.

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#5

Could there be a local firewall getting in the way? I haven't used Windows for some time, and certainly not Windows 10, so I'm not sure what its default setup is in that area.

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#6

I did say IMO. I don't think prejudice comes into it though, just experience. But of course you are right about all platforms having strengths and weaknesses.

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#7

So is it now working, having typed it correctly?

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#8

127.0.0.1 is, of course local access only so the Windows Firewall wont be involved at all. It would only work from the browser on the same machine that is running Node-RED.

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#9

Thanks for the idea. I will check that as well. I also notice that on my Windows 8 machine, Node.js is only using a fraction of a percent of CPU, and on the WIndows 10, it is using about 35% and the drive light is going nuts. This is even after a fresh install of Node.js. Is there a way to halt the node.js from the CMD without closing it? Maybe that will let me at least get it talking again and I can see if my flow created a loop or something it can't get out of. I am not an experienced programmer, so very possible I just broke something.

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#10

That isn't my experience. Having worked extensively with both Windows and Linux. Each have their own place and there is no problem at all doing development on Windows and it is still by far the most popular platform - there may be some reasons for that? :wink:

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#11

Just to help fill in the details, I searched and moved the flows_"computername" files and was able to connect again without incident. Of course my flows are lost now, but I must have created a non-recoverable loop in there some how. I was working with a flow that involved ip addressing. I will be more careful next time.

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#12

Well you can start with a blank flow as you have. Then import the old flow using the menu import.... then edit it to remove the problem. Before you deploy

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#13

Excellent tip, thank you. I will do that.

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#14

I had issues when installing Node-Red in the WSL bash shell. WSL doesn't support iptables (yet?) so the regular Ubuntu instruction fail.

Even though 127.0.0.1 is local, the firewall still blocked port 1880. I added a custom firewall rule to allow TCP in/out on that port and all works now.

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